Dating jordanian guy


01-Sep-2017 10:00

Prior to making this comment I want to share with you, I spent TWO MONTHS dedicated into reading and informing myself about Islamic culture, I started to read Quran, I searched for statistic data, I have seen more than 100 youtube videos on women rights in Islam, I talked to my Palestinian friends, to my Turkish friends, my family and I was constantly thinking and observing my brainstorming process.

What I have found while doing it was not only the answer about what to do in my particular situation, but it was also something more important - a whole NEW PERSPECTIVE ABOUT MYSELF and my psyche profile.

I met my prince charming on a very first night I came to USA where I stayed for three months which I spend working on one environment project.

I wasn't EVEN THINKING about having anything with him since he was a Muslim from Jordan, appeared much older than me and I was just buying a slice of pizza in a pizzeria he was working at.

On the topic of men and women and what each one wishes they could say to each other without throwing a tantrum and eventually breaking up: Here’s my two cents.

Well, trust me when I say, just like you don’t want random guys adding you on Facebook, we don’t want random women adding us on Facebook. During my time on Facebook, I’ve been added by quite a few women, yet I never threw a shit storm and sent “Why the hell are you adding me? Face it, Facebook has its perils as well – and a block button.

It seems only right that you should return some of that respect by showing a grasp of some basic aspects of Jordanian, Arab and Muslim culture.

So if you’re looking for one-night-stands, you’re out of luck. We (probably) know more about your culture than you know about ours.

I’d suggest forgetting about the local girl and try hooking up with another female expat. So if you’re aiming to date a local Ammanite girl, set all of your previous dating expectations aside, go with the flow and enjoy the ride.

You’ll most likely find yourself luckier in a hipster tea shop, a bar/lounge or an ‘International (place type of art here) Festival’ instead of your traditional sheesha coffee shop. While this lifestyle may clash with the traditional Arab Middle Eastern mentality, keep in mind that we’re city kids. We’re *Not* Up All Night To Get Lucky I overheard an expat share this glorious gem to his friend: ‘No matter where you’re from, everyone wants sex. ’ – aiming for a local sitting at the bar with her friends. It’s been imprinted in our brains over and over again that no matter what the situation is, we should never, ever, ever have sex before we get married because if we loose our V-Card, no one will want to marry us. We love to party in spite of living with our parents and having strict curfews.

Conservative girls are less likely to take interest in you, and are also less likely to go to a place that serves alcohol. We’ve formed our own sets of ideologies that allows us to bend religious and social barriers to own our will. From both a religious and a social perspective, that rule is rarely broken by Ammanite girls. We’re bilingual and can communicate with you at ease*.Tourists do not share the same rights over Jordanian culture. Outward appearance is the one facet of interaction between locals and Western tourists most open to misunderstandings on both sides.